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Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)
or councils or lords or mps, it's our future so we should be involved. the government of this country has agreed to the u.n., when it will involve young people in making decisions that affect them and their lives. october 2011, the a century ray ray-survey was conducted and the result shows 78% only -- young people feel they've never been consulted. that's only one-fifth, justifies owe a fifth of people that have in a country that prides itself and promotes equal rights for all. this isn't right. the has been a similar campaign for this in the past. sexual relationship, education, was nearly made compulsory and it was very nearly the law. unfortunately due to the general elections it was dropped. we have done this once before, and we can do it again, but this time, we can make it a reality in schools and as a part of the national curriculum, not a script to be followed but lessons to be learned for life. thank you. [cheers and applause] >> thank you. for that speech of proposition. got us off to a contributing start. now to oppose the proposition, i call natasha brown. >> thank you, mr. s
-creation of the decisive moment that claimed lord nelson's life, setting it amid the crushing congestion of towering masts, torn sails and the fog of cannon fire at precariously close quarters. the reviews were good. (reader) "mr. turner... has detailed the death of his hero, while he has suggested the whole of a great naval victory, which we believe has never before been successfully accomplished, if it has been before attempted, in a single picture." (narrator) the napoleonic war ended in 1815 at waterloo. the duke of wellington had called the battle "a damn close run-thing." the fragility of civilization intrigued turner throughout his career. the decline of the carthaginian empire depicts the crushing penalty rome inflicted on the carthaginians. the architecture is elegant but the messy dockside suggests the end of a defeated imperial power. the women of vanquished carthage are bidding farewell to their men as they sail towards rome, human spoils of war bound for slavery or death. in 1818, turner was 43. in the twenty years that britain had been at war, he had become a public figure, his reputation ba
. and the question in front of the house of commons and, indeed, the house of lords is simply this. because we currently have that data for -- what are we going to do as it increasingly moves over the internet? we can't stand here and did nothing and not update the law. the consequence of doing that will be fewer crimes solved, fewer terrorists brought to justice. i do not want to be the prime minister that puts that country into this position. >> the government's proposal on judicial review conflict with article 29 of magna carta 1297. does the government proposed repeal of magna carta? >> no, i can reassure my honorable friend we don't want to do that. but i'm sure he will understand that -- >> order. i'd like to learn about 1297 from the prime minister. i'm sure i'm about to. >> the point where making is the extent of judicial review has massively increased in recent years, and we think there is a need for some new rules to look at the extent and, indeed, the costs of judicial review so the costs are properly covered. i think in the way we can maintain access to justice but perhaps speed up
in the the city of david is a savior this christ the lord. we all need a sav saviour. >> we need saving from our sins. from ourselves. from our faults. but a lot of people need being saved financially. they need to be saved emotionally. they need to be saved relationally. out of a life of drug abuse or a battered wife. throw the football are a lot of people. there is -- there are a lot of people -- the sal expectations is personal and -- the salvation is personal and it is universal in the salvation of jesus christ on the cross dying for our sins but also what else do i need to be saved from in my life and it is an ongoing thing. >> sean: you probably are the second biggest seller of books of anybody. two books i read, heaven is real, the story of this little boy. and piper's book dan piper i think is his name, 90 minutes in heaven. >> yeah. >> sean: what do you think happens when you die? what do you think happens? >> well, the bible says real clearly to be absent from the body is to be present with the lord. in other words, i instantly go into the presence of god. >> sean: that's it? >> that's
wanted to welcome into your family? >> well, we went there guided by the lord. and she was the one the lord put in front of us. we don't say no to the lord. >> jenny, can you tell me what you are going through now, if you are hearing anything at all about little anastasia? >> we haven't heard anything. i think there's just the rumors flying around. i get online to try to see what i can find out, but, you know, that's not helping. i'm just a wreck. >> how have you managed -- i mean, you have obviously have a beautiful family. you've reached out. how have you managed this time of uncertainty? >> we pray. we cry. we get cranky. i mean, my child's a half a world away, and i feel like any mom wouldn't be able to get through that very easily. >> does she know at all -- do you have any idea if she knows what's happening, what's going on, if she realizes herself that you might not be reunited? >> we don't have any idea about that. we have to think that it's a bit of a stretch for a 4-year-old to understand that. even if you explained it fully to her, i don't think she'd understand. it's ha
. the troika is also calling for more regulation of credit policies. they say the banks lord separate into taking out dodgy loans. >> one of the factors that contributed to this excess of liquidity in the separate banking sector is the attraction of foreign deposits. at this point in time, the total amount of foreign deposits is more than 21 billion euros, more than gdp. >> most of the money came from russian investors. tens of thousands of them have made cypress their second home. in germany's federal intelligence service, a to says most of their accounts contain laundered money. the cypriot government denies that. now the country is hoping newly discovered gas reserves off the coast will help pay back credit from the eu in a relatively short time. the first contract with energy companies have been signed. while billions are being spent to bail out the banks, many indebted families feel they have been abandoned. >> seven months ago, we applied for social welfare relief. we have not had an answer yet. >> antonin solaris as a bit of money driving a taxi. he says the streets are becomin
. the question in front of the house of commons and house of lords is simply this -- because we currently have that data for 50 mobile telephone companies, and what will we do when tele- communications move over the internet? we could do nothing and not update the law. the consequence of that will be fewer terrorists brought to justice. i do not want to be the prime minister of the country that puts us into that position. >> -- >> mr. speaker, the government's proposal conflicts with article 29. does the government propose the repeal of magna carta? >> we do not intend that. i am sure he would understand i would like to learn about 1297 from the prime minister. the point we are making is the extent has massively increased. i think we can maintain access to justice but speed up the wheels of government a little. >> will the prime minister answer the question asked many times by my friend a few moments ago? will he confirm the majority of households will be hit by accountability and tax credit? >> the point i made is bigger. everyone on working tax credits will be affected. we have to control we
1775, of " if that man, lord dunmore, does not crash before spring, he will become the most formidable enemy america has -- at is our first president, george washington. >> i think george washington said this when he was up in massachusetts in the beginning of december 1775 or maybe late november. communications were slow in these days. washington, in the point in time, probably the most recent things he knew about done more -- about dunmore was probably as close to the peak of his power in virginia because ultimately he was chased out of virginia. but during the summer and fall of 1775, he was very effective in sending out troops to read plantations. -- to read plantations. he was during of the indians. they could find refuge and get the fleet of the british army. even stirred up the instruction of indentured servants. not only did look like he might succeed, but there were rumors that he would ascend the party in the area of alexandria, va irginia. george washington is up there in massachusetts were about his wife. even thomas jefferson were about his wife at the same time. and i put
-shirt. >> oh, lord. >> are they for sale? >> my question is for dave barry. howdy pronounced the letter between -- >> is very simple their 27 letters in the english alphabet. we all know. it is pronounced commences right here flagging the time pass the teeth and then back again to form a soft or hard flick it depending on the usage. >> we time it would be really fun to create a fake letter. five pages devoted to nonsense. the invisible person has a question. >> any other questions? >> sprint. come on. >> i'm sorry. >> this question is for dave. cooling off memory, two things. one, today really pay you have a vacation so you could write a book about it? how tall are you? palace want to be the tallest person in the room. i was wondering. >> they did pay me to write the book. that's kind of power works. yes. they give me money. i know that's weird. >> you are going on vacation. >> it was kind of like that. i was crying -- trying to describe it was actually like as opposed to learning facts about japan. the other thing, if i were in the room with you you would not be the tallest person. >> we have
,000 pounds a year. 107,000 pounds. he went along with it. he went along with it. the party of lord george. he went along with it. now, now, he hasn't kept his promise on all of us being in it together. two years ago, he said by 2015 "we will have balanced the books." can he explain why he has so badly failed to keep that promise? >> let me give you the figures. in 2009 there was 16,000 people earning more than a million. in 2010 when the rate went up, this plummeted to 6,000 people. therefore, because of his election gamut 50 p it cost the country seven billion pounds. when is he going to realize, tax rate is about raising money not about punishing success. that is what we need him to understand. that in terms of the deficit, we have cut the budget deficit by 25%. you will get an update of the progress in a minute. how on earth, can you deal with a borrowing problem when pledging to borrow more? >> let's be clear, mr. speaker, about his answer on 50 p. the answer to the problem -- the answer to the problem of tax avoidance is to give the people doing it a tax cut. that is the answer he gave.
of the admiralty, but churchill's stand was all over it. he had been twice lord of the admiralty. he thought in terms of ships and navies, and strategic possibilities with ships. so he was very keen on this. >> so how do that and? >> the admiral in gibraltar discuss it with his captains. some of whom were friends with the french admiral that they would have to attack him and they radioed back through england, to the abaco and they said we think this is a terrible idea. is going to alienate french every. they will hate us. you can't do this. and if you don't mind, let me read the admiralty's letter back. it was the eating of the second and this has firm intention of his majesty's government, that if the french do not accept any of your alternatives they are to be destroyed. so admiral somerville from gibraltar sales out with his flotilla, one of the ships was the hms hood, later destroyed by the bismarck. so it was a big flotilla. and during the night when they were sailing, churchill since somerville this message. churchill to somerville, you are charged with one of the most disagreeable and
in this house to help bring that about. i have received information and as the first lord of the treasury, i think i can confidently predict that it will be a decision that will go down. >> as this is the good season of a good season and humbug, the top tax was 40 p, the gap between rich and poor was widens, and they left more in the gap? >> they left a record deficits. -- deficit. they have never apologized for a word of it. >> last, but not least, tom clarke. >> there are people who are perhaps watching the proceedings to are very interested in the issue of poverty. the body which advised that we are approaching 9 million households, a record, since records first began, and will be explained to the house and to our constituents as we approach christmas, what is the government prepared to do about this horrible scandal of fuel poverty? >> the honorable gentleman is entirely right that this is a scandal. as i said, we are committed to tackling poverty. we have kept the increase permit. we are and molesting him -- investing in a scheme and they promised to abolish fuel poverty, but they put i
! >> that is beautiful. what is that, velvet? oh, my lord. >> i'm going to give you something really nice. yeah, that looks perfect. >> what else do you have? >> hey, here's a little mickey for you. >> oh, look at that, santa. >> this is for you. >> and a mug for you. >> i've already got a mug, santa. this is the most cheap, rundown, broke santa i've ever seen. >> have a little ball for you, too. merry christmas, everybody. merry christmas. merry christmas, everybody. merry christmas. >> santa, before you scare anymore suburban children, how did you get -- are you having a good christmas, santa? i know you're a busy man, traveling the world. you stopped by the overnight. >> santa had some laughing gas, apparently. >> we're going to send you off. you have more kids to stop with. >> yes, i have to travel, yes, i do. >> you look good, santa. is that a very expensive suit? >> very expensive. nothing for you. nothing! >> this is wonderful, santa. >> merry christmas, everybody! >> hold on, hold on. it's the emmy committee. yes, we accept. thank you kindly. >>> this is >>> this morning on "world news
filibuster reform. >> oh, lord. >> democrats have been complaining about the filibuster for years now, since actually they took over the senate, and now they have a chance to get rid of the filibuster. there's nothing in the constitution. madison wrote nothing of the filibuster. but i want everybody to hear, though, because for the past four years, we have been hearing how evil the republican party is because they filibuster. >> yeah. >> harry reid, the democratic senate, senators like claire mccaskill, senators like, you know, kirsten gillibrand, senators like chuck schumer. they can all get rid of the filibuster at the beginning of january. so why don't -- if the filibuster is so evil and if the republicans are so evil for wielding the filibuster, this is very easy. just make the rules in january -- forget filibuster reform. i support getting rid of the entire filibuster. >> i agree. >> let's wipe it out. so why don't we get the democrats to get rid of the fill bust filibuster? >> because people across the country agree 100%. you get outside washington, it's a no-brainer. majority should r
said while i was there inn there, lord, just get me out of here. it wasn't an everyday prayer. it was an all-day long prayer. god, please just get me out of here alive. >> bill: how did they get you out? how did you finally get out? >> well, after three different lawyers and pain, these three different lawyers, 70 to $80,000 in american money, none of these -- one of them actually got one of the charges dropped. but i'm still charged with possession of controlled substance. and after 70, $80,000, they all took the money and ran. i actually am thankful to my aunt, my aunt consistently called the united states consulate. after a period of time of calling them and calling them and calling them, they told me i could put in for a transfer and i put in for a transfer. two years, 2 1/2 years after i was in there. after i did put in the transfer, i got transferred out of there by the united states consulate. >> bill: so they got you out of the country? >> they got me out of the country. >> bill: after all the pressure that your aunt put on them. that's what's going to have to happen i
a number of studies, very large studies done with autistic children. dr. catherine lord spoke with one this morning "the new york times" and went through the whole thing thoroughly. the result of it is that there is less likelihood of a child with autism to have an aggression against other people than there is for typical children, so not only is there no evidence that supports the fact that they are violent to other people, but they are actually less violent towards other people than typical people and when you really get into these stories about violence and you see children or young adults, what you're going to see generally is people with alcohol or drug problems or some other situation. they're seven to ten times more likely to be violent than typical children and autistic children are less so. sometimes, they are self injurious, but rarely to other people. these kinds of generalizations are killing us. these parents of children with autism, they're frightened, angry. people are talking about you know, autism as though they're acquainted with it. they're using it as a generalizati
a personal concern there, too. >> lord dunmore, what was his position? >> he was the royal governor of virginia and he was also a guy with an incredible ego. an awful lot of inability to make decisions because he was so caught up in himself and his potential success. >> you called him combative, touchy and arrogant. >> well, arrogant like so many of the british aristocracy would have been. but he was an odd duck. when he captured and built some of the ports in the ohio valley, he named them after his subsidiary titles. he was the baron blair. it was fort dunmore for a while. he had an ego a mile wide. >> so what was the relationship in those days between george washington and dunmore? >> they knew each other. late winter, before the hostilities got intense in the capital of virginia, they were on some terms. they were both land speculators and they shared in this interest and george washington was developing those and dunmore was buying all that he could get. but then they fell out. i don't think they fell out so much for personal reasons. this guy's way of doing business was sendin
of "lord of the rings," the series, new movie, "the hobbit," an unexpected journey may be something to check out. >> looking forward to it. shot in faster speed and 3-d, the sequences are so real people say they feel like they're inside the movie. abc's david wright has more. >> reporter: when a movie is described as a roller-coaster ride that is usually just a figure of speech. not so, "the hobbit." at the new zealand premier, some fans said some scenes actually gave them motion sickness. you have to hold your stomach down and let your eyes pop at first to adjust, tweeted one fan. turns out director peter jackson used a new technique in filming the movie. >> i always want to have the audience immersed in the film. >> reporter: not only is it 3d it is filmed at a faster speed. >> i want people to feel like they're going into the movie. ♪ >> reporter: back in the silent movie era when they cranked the camera by hand, filmmakers tended to film at 16 frames per second, which is why charlie chaplain's movies have the herky-jerky quality today. with the introduction of sound, projector
they do. i think we all know it is what the good lord blessed them with. they can only work out so much. i am never going to look like that. >> so blessed. so blessed. >>> meanwhile, we move on to serious news this morning. particularly new concerns about the ongoing civil war in syria. the concerns now center on the possible use of chemical weapons by syrian government forces. >> for the latest we are joined by abc's alex marquardt joining us live from the turkish side of the syrian border. alex, thank you for joining us this morning. >> reporter: good morning, rob, and paula. that's right. the united states has been concerned for a long time about syria's chemical weapons stockpile which is believed to be one of the biggest in the world. what has changed now is that in the last few days according to u.s. officials, it is believed that syria went into the preparation stage, loading components of the highly toxic, highly deadly sarin gas, a nerve agent into bombs at syrian airfield. now, syria doesn't even acknowledge that it has chemical weapons. they said they would never use them agains
that there was a problem here. and lord halifax who was not by any means stupid, halifax said winston hates door mats. he will simply walk over you. you have to argue back. learning how to argue back with winston was an art form. and it wasn't clear that, you know, if he shouted at you you just shouted backment but you had to find ways of getting your point of view back. and he would respect you if you did that. whereas if you either lost your cool or you just let him walk over you, you were finished. >> you had to find a way to cleverly make your point. >> you had to make your point and he would listen and he would respect. but he was absolutely, his answer, he believes the power of words also was the power of words in discussion. >> okay, he would like to get his own way. but he would listen to other people. and the one without really plattered in the second world war was alan brook who was his chief of staff. alanbrook was a tough ulsterman. if he didn't like something churchill said he would say t say it back. we often sit at his table, we would snap his pencil in error if he thought it was stupid. a
you were, every morning you put your head down on the desk and you said the lord's prayer, which was regarded as nondenominational. now, today you can't do that. my question to you is without faith in the classroom and they're impressionable kids, they don't know the difference between right and wrong in many cases. whether that would have stopped this crazy guy in newtown, i don't know, but it seems to me faith in schools, particularly for these young kids should be restored in some way. >> well, i'm a catholic and i was raised in a pretty strong faith environment with my family. and i certainly had this at my school. and i don't disagree with you. i think it's all sorts of things, larry. it's the lack of parental guidance, as well. i think it's the breakdown of the social fabric of the family in america and many other countries. but the particular problem for america, which no other country that has the video -- britain has mental health issues, britain has the same videos, the same hollywood movies, britain has all the social problems that america has albeit on a smaller scale
's friends. his best friends she didn't like at all. lord beaverbrook and brendon bracken who was a strange irishman who once claimed churchill was his father and churchill didn't do anything to diminish the rumor. she didn't like the gambling winston did before the war in mon monte carlo. he never did well. she had a nervous temperament her daughter wrote. one year i think they had four dinners alone, 1944, clementine and winston. and if they were at dinner aides were coming in, bombs were falling and the house was full of guests. russian diplomats she doesn't want there. she had a very hard time. i'm not sure -- again i mentioned earlier winston was not sympathetic or empathetic over matters of mental anxiety, that sort of thing. host: what did you conclude about his mental health? guest: that was interesting. i had long talk with my editor bill tphreufpls -- phillips and they warn against a retroactive diagnosis but this whole black dog thing started in a letter he wrote in 1911. he never used the term again. a and coville and others who worked for him, nannies would say to their childre
that anybody who thinks that it's possible to devise such a theory to read lord devlin's book called the enforcement of mortals. and as whitaker chambers said, to live is to maneuver. if you pa mover -- maneuver, you're not bound hand and foot to some principle you'll never aller. alter. so i don't think it's useful to talk about true conservativism or this, that or the other thing. it's useful to talk about common sense, it's useful to talk about results, it's useful to talk about conservative impulse. but abstractions i would steer away from. >> host: you also michael oak shot, also sounds very much like michael oakshot. >> guest: yeah, a lot of quite good people have taken that position. and i must say i owe the fact that i take it not to my own thought, but to theirs. >> host: are there, are there other things about the book that you would want to call the audience's attention to that i have failed to ask of you? >> guest: well, the martinis articles, i think, are crucial to western civilization. >> host: so i also enjoyed the agatha agatha christie article. this is not just a bo
half a having new jobs. second, as the lord also recommends, we're going to support industries and technologies where britain has a clear advantage with my right honorable friend the business secretary's support, we will extend our global lead in aerospace and support the supply chains of advanced manufacturing. we're also taking big steps to support british companies to export to asia, africa and the americas. i am increasing the funding for ukti by over 25% a year so it can help more firms build the capacity of overseas british chambers and maintain our country's position as the number one destination in europe for foreign investment. and we are launching a new one and a half billion pound export finance facility to support the purchase of british exports. third, we are addressing the credit problems for companies, we're creating a new business bank, and today we confirm we're providing it with one billion pounds of extra capital which will lever private lending to help small and medium-sized firms and bring together existing schemes. and, fourth, we are going to cut business
responders starting with emotional applause as they entered the room. >> so we ask you, lord to walk with us. >> and later with prayer. >> to listen to what they saw that was not for anyone to ever see. >> mr. obama privately met with many of the victims' families. in this photo, he's holding the granddaughter of dawn hochsprung sandy hook's principal, killed friday when she tried to stop the gunman. >> as a community, you've inspired us newtown. >> he also did his part to ease one fear in this town that they would be forever defined. >> in the face of unconscionable evil. >> by this tragedy. >> you looked out for each other. you cared for one another, and you've loved one another. this is how newtown will be remembered. >> newtown police held a press conference a short time ago. they say the school the elementary school is still a crime scene. they have not said when it will reopen or norah, if it will ever reopen. >> this memorial last night that the president spoke at was also a time for him to deliver a message too, and he said there is no excuse for inaction
tbe a -- not our mothers or fathers or teachers or councils or lords or mps, it's our future so we should be involved. the government this country has aged to the u.n., when it will involve young people in making decisions that affect them and their lives. ocber 2011, the a century ray ray-survey was conducted and the result shows 78% only -- young people feel they've never been consulted. that's only one-fifth, justifies owe a fifth of people that have in a country that prides itself and promotes equal rights for all. this isn't right. the has been a similar campaign for this in the past. sexual relationship, education, was nearly made compulsory and it was very nearly the law. unfortunately due to the general elections it was dropped. we have done this once before, and we can do it again, but this time, we can make it a reality in schools and as a part of the national curriculum, not a script to be followed but lessons to be learned for life. thank you. [cheers and applause] >> thank you. for that speech of proposition. got us off to a contributing start. now to oppose the propo
need to ask the lord on that one. because i think, you know, at some point, i'll probably run out of gas. but right now, i feel like i still got a full tank. man, i'm going. >>> up next, george washington's cows. some of america's rarest animals in so many ways. "in focus." was founded back in , they've been committed to putting clients first. helping generations through tough times. good times. never taking a bailout. there when you need them. helping millions of americans over the centuries. the strength of a global financial leader. the heart of a one-to-one relationship. together for your future. ♪ anne's tablet called my phone. anne's tablet was chatting with a tablet in sydney... a desktop in zurich... and a telepresence room in brazil. the secure cloud helped us get some numbers from my assistant's pc in new york. and before i reached the top, the board meeting became a congrats we sold the company party. wait til my wife's phone hears about this. [ cellphone vibrating ] [ female announcer ] with cisco at the center, working together has never worked so well. [ cellphone
of his mouth, the lord is already near, come, let us adore him. it was a spiritual message. in the middle of the message he reflected on the traditional family which we know the church supports and has long supported. and defended. and he made glancing reference to our personal selfishness and said that's a threat to the family. people not wanting to make commitments. and therefore give of their time and their energy to have families in the first place. and then he made reference to this manipulation of nature. but he never mentioned gay marriage. he never mentioned gay people in there. so i think, you know, it is it was certainly one can interpret that was the focus of what he was talking about in that particular paragraph. but i think to characterize the whole message that way is reductive. he was calling all of us to task for various failings, in our personal lives, and i think that the message is that the dialogue -- we have to engage in an ongoing dialogue, even with those who disagree with us. i would include gay people. >> raymond arroyo, thank you for joining us with your take on
the threats of theocracy. you use the comparison of iran. good lord. we are so far from any possible menace of religious orthodoxy. try to have a prayer at a high- school football game in texas. there is zero grounds. i do not see it. nor do i think in the members of the religious right, and i know many of them, any desire to tyrannize. they went into politics because they felt they were attacked. they want to be left alone. [applause] >> i appreciate you as a voice of reason. [inaudible] my question is more about historical and interpretation. what do think it keeps us so deeply in our ongoing philosophy of what democracy should be? >> that is a separate question. there are two in my ignorance. the continental french -- enlightenments. the continental french enlightenment. they differ radically. the british enlightenment was empirical and temperate. the french enlightenment was severe. one gave rise to be glorious revolution and eventually the american revolution. the french enlightenment gave rise to the french revolution and a blood bath. this sounds like a philosophy seminar. what do we
purposes. show them the best way to use their talents and opportunities to honor and serve you. lord, keep them from being so mired in political gridlock that they fail to do what is best for this land we love. may they speak today words that are constructive and helpful, bringing encouragement as well as vision to their work. let your glory be seen in this place. we pray in your holy name. amen. the presiding officer: please join me in reciting the pledge of allegiance. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington, d.c, december 5, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable kirsten e. gillibrand, a senator from the state of new york, to perform the duties of the chair. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. reid: following leader remarks, the senate will be in a pe
Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)